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Alone - Netflix

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Alone is a ten-episode series that is the country's boldest and longest survival experiment ever captured for television. It places ten hardcore survivalists alone in the Vancouver Island wilderness - no camera crew, no teams, no producers - on a single mission to stay alive. At stake is \$500,000 awarded to the person who can last the longest. They will face extreme isolation and psychological distress as they plunge into the unknown, self-documenting their experience.

Alone - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2015-06-18

Alone - Sola fide - Netflix

Sola fide (Latin: by faith alone), also known as justification by faith alone, is a Christian theological doctrine commonly held to distinguish many Protestant churches from the Catholic Church, as well as the Eastern Orthodox Churches and Oriental Orthodox Churches. The doctrine of sola fide asserts God's pardon for guilty sinners is granted to and received through faith alone, excluding all “works”. All mankind, it is asserted, is fallen and sinful, under the curse of God, and incapable of saving itself from God's wrath and curse. But God, on the basis of the life, death, and resurrection of his Son, Jesus Christ alone (solus Christus), grants sinners judicial pardon, or justification, which is received solely through faith. Christ's righteousness, according to the followers of “sola fide,” is imputed (or attributed) by God to the believing sinner (as opposed to infused or imparted), so that the divine verdict and pardon of the believing sinner is based not upon anything in the sinner, but upon Jesus Christ and his righteousness alone, which are received through faith alone. Justification is by faith alone and is distinguished from the other graces of salvation. See the ordo salutis for more detail on the doctrine of salvation considered more broadly than justification by faith alone. Lutheran and Reformed churches have held to sola-fide justification in opposition to Roman Catholicism especially, but also in opposition to significant aspects of Eastern Orthodoxy. These Protestant churches exclude all human works (except the works of Jesus Christ, which form the basis of justification) from the legal verdict (or pardon) of justification. According to Martin Luther, justification by faith alone is the article on which the Church stands or falls. Thus, “faith alone” is foundational to Lutheranism and Reformed Christianity, and as a formula distinguishes it from other Christian denominations. However, theological discussion in the centuries since the Reformation and Counter-Reformation has suggested that the differences are in emphasis and concepts rather than doctrine, since the Roman Catholics or Orthodox do not in fact hold that works are a basis of justification or a means of salvation, and most Protestants do in fact accept the need for repentance and the primacy of grace. See § Lutheran World Federation and the Roman Catholic Church and § Lutheran-Orthodox Joint Commission below. Further, many Protestant churches actually hold more nuanced positions such as sola gratia, sola fide or justification by faith (i.e., without the alone). In the General Council of Trent the Catholic Church cautioned against an extreme version of sola fide in canon XIV on self-righteousness and justification without repentance that “If any one saith, that man is truly absolved from his sins and justified, because that he assuredly believed himself absolved and justified; or, that no one is truly justified but he who believes himself justified; and that, by this faith alone, absolution and justification are effected; let him be anathema (excommunicated).” However, since Luther's first of his 95 Theses was a call to repentance, opposing this canon to actual Lutheran theology is problematic. Christian theologies answer questions about the nature, function, and meaning of justification quite differently. These issues include: Is justification an event occurring instantaneously or is it an ongoing process? Is justification effected by divine action alone (monergism), by divine and human action together (synergism), or by human action? Is justification permanent or can it be lost? What is the relationship of justification to sanctification, the process whereby sinners become righteous and are enabled by the Holy Spirit to live lives pleasing to God?

Alone - Mennonite - Netflix

Confession of Faith in a Mennonite Perspective (1995)—copyrighted Summary: A typical Anabaptist confession of faith. Salvation is variously expressed, sometimes as “justification by faith,” in which case it means that the just person has accepted the offer of a covenantal relationship, and lives according to that covenant.

Alone - References - Netflix